drugs for ibs

Drugs to Treat IBS

wangenAt least 20 million Americans have been diagnosed with IBS. The drug companies are beginning to tap into this hefty target market by offering medicines aimed at relieving the symptoms of IBS. These drugs alter the physiology and ultimately the action of the digestive tract, but they do not address the underlying causes of IBS, or even claim to cure IBS. These drugs also come with an alarming variety of warnings and side effects.

Six types of drugs are used to treat the different symptoms of IBS. They include the following:

1. IBS-specific drugs to control the speed with which the bowels move (Zelnorm, Lotronex, and Calmactin),
2. Laxatives to treat constipation (such as Milk of Magnesia, Ex-Lax, Perdiem, and MiraLax),
3. Antidiarrheal agents to treat diarrhea (such as Imodium and Lomotil),
4. Antispasmodics to relive the pain from abdominal cramps (such as Donnatal, Levsin, Levbid, NuLev, Bentyl, and Pro-Banthine),
5. Antidepressants to relieve pain (such as Prozac, Celexa, Zoloft, Paxil, and Elavil), and
6. Narcotic analgesics to relieve pain (such as Vicodin, Demerol, and Xanax).

Note that these drugs are categorized by the type of symptom that they treat. None of them cure IBS. These drugs change how you experience IBS by forcing changes in the biochemistry of your body. None is capable of curing IBS, because IBS is not caused by a drug deficiency. Treatment with these drugs does not address the cause of your IBS, and once you stop using the drugs the symptoms will return. The use of these drugs often results in serious side effects and/or negative long-term consequences. More information about these medications can be found in the book, The Irritable Bowel Syndrome Solution.

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(img source: wikimedia via creative.commons.org)
(img source: wikimedia via creative.commons.org)

At least 20 million Americans have been diagnosed with IBS.

The drug companies are beginning to tap into this hefty target market by offering medicines aimed at relieving the symptoms of IBS. These drugs alter the physiology and ultimately the action of the digestive tract, but they do not address the underlying causes of IBS, or even claim to cure IBS. These drugs also come with an alarming variety of warnings and side effects.

Six types of drugs are used to treat the different symptoms of IBS.

They include the following:

  1. IBS-specific drugs to control the speed with which the bowels move (Zelnorm, Lotronex, and Calmactin),
  2. laxatives to treat constipation (such as Milk of Magnesia, Ex-Lax, Perdiem, and MiraLax),
  3. antidiarrheal agents to treat diarrhea (such as Imodium and Lomotil),
  4. antispasmodics to relive the pain from abdominal cramps (such as Donnatal, Levsin, Levbid, NuLev, Bentyl, and Pro-Banthine),
  5. antidepressants to relieve pain (such as Prozac, Celexa, Zoloft, Paxil, and Elavil), and
  6. narcotic analgesics to relieve pain (such as Vicodin, Demerol, and Xanax).

 
Note that these drugs are categorized by the type of symptom that they treat. None of them cure IBS. These drugs change how you experience IBS by forcing changes in the biochemistry of your body. None is capable of curing IBS, because IBS is not caused by a drug deficiency.

Treatment with these drugs does not address the cause of your IBS, and once you stop using the drugs the symptoms will return. The use of these drugs often results in serious side effects and/or negative long-term consequences.

QUESTIONS? Contact our office at the IBS Treatment Center.
COMMENTS? Feel free to add your thoughts below.

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At least 20 million Americans have been diagnosed with IBS.

Drug companies are beginning to tap into this hefty target market by offering medicines aimed at relieving the symptoms of IBS. These drugs alter the physiology and ultimately the action of the digestive tract, but they do not address the underlying causes of IBS, or even claim to cure IBS.

These drugs also come with an alarming variety of warnings and side effects.

Six types of drugs are used to treat the different symptoms of IBS. They include the following:

  1. IBS-specific drugs to control the speed with which the bowels move (Zelnorm, Lotronex, and Calmactin),
  2. Laxatives to treat constipation (such as Milk of Magnesia, Ex-Lax, Perdiem, and MiraLax),
  3. Antidiarrheal agents to treat diarrhea (such as Imodium and Lomotil),
  4. Antispasmodics to relive the pain from abdominal cramps (such as Donnatal, Levsin, Levbid, NuLev, Bentyl, and Pro-Banthine),
  5. Antidepressants to relieve pain (such as Prozac, Celexa, Zoloft, Paxil, and Elavil), and
  6. Narcotic analgesics to relieve pain (such as Vicodin, Demerol, and Xanax).

Note that these drugs are categorized by the type of symptom that they treat.

None of them cure IBS.

These drugs change how you experience IBS by forcing changes in the biochemistry of your body. None is capable of curing IBS, because IBS is not caused by a drug deficiency. Treatment with these drugs does not address the cause of your IBS, and once you stop using the drugs the symptoms will return.

The use of these drugs often results in serious side effects and/or negative long-term consequences.

For more information, check out The Irritable Bowel Syndrome Solution or contact our office at Info@IBSTreatmentCenter.com.

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(image thanks to birthofanewearth.blogspot.com)

At least 20 million Americans have been diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). The drug companies are tapping into this hefty target market by offering medicines aimed at relieving the symptoms of IBS.

These drugs alter the physiology and ultimately the action of the digestive tract, but they do not address the underlying causes of IBS, or even claim to cure IBS. These drugs also come with an alarming variety of warnings and side effects.

Six types of drugs are used to treat the different symptoms of IBS. They include the following:

  1. IBS-specific drugs to control the speed with which the bowels move (Zelnorm, Lotronex, and Calmactin),
  2. Laxatives to treat constipation (such as Milk of Magnesia, Ex-Lax, Perdiem, and MiraLax),
  3. Antidiarrheal agents to treat diarrhea (such as Imodium and Lomotil),
  4. Antispasmodics to relive the pain from abdominal cramps (such as Donnatal, Levsin, Levbid, NuLev, Bentyl, and Pro-Banthine),
  5. Antidepressants to relieve pain (such as Prozac, Celexa, Zoloft, Paxil, and Elavil), and
  6. Narcotic analgesics to relieve pain (such as Vicodin, Demerol, and Xanax).

 
Note that these drugs are categorized by the type of symptom that they treat. None of them cure IBS.

These drugs change how you experience IBS by forcing changes in the biochemistry of your body. None is capable of curing IBS, because IBS is not caused by a drug deficiency. Treatment with these drugs does not address the cause of your IBS, and once you stop using the drugs the symptoms will return. The use of these drugs often results in serious side effects and/or negative long-term consequences.

More information about these medications can be found in the book, The Irritable Bowel Syndrome Solution.

Image thanks to birthofanewearth.blogspot

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This article is yet another recitation of the problems that can be caused by using heavy duty drugs to try to reduce symptoms rather than identifying and treating the cause of the symptoms.

From the NYTimes Blog:

Long-term use of the drugs, called proton pump inhibitors, or P.P.I.’s, can make it difficult to absorb some nutrients. Ms. Rudell, 33, has been taking these medications on and off for nearly a decade. Her doctor treated her anemia with high doses of iron, and recommended she try to manage without a P.P.I., but that’s been difficult, she said. “I’m hoping I’ll get off the P.P.I. after I complete my residency training,” she said, “but that’s still several years away.”

As many as four in 10 Americans have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, and many depend on P.P.I.’s like Prilosec, Prevacid and Nexium to reduce stomach acid. These are the third highest-selling class of drugs in the United States, after antipsychotics and statins, with more than 100 million prescriptions and $13.9 billion in sales in 2010, in addition to over-the-counter sales.

But in recent years, the Food and Drug Administration has issued numerous warnings about P.P.I.’s, saying long-term use and high doses have been associated with an increased risk of bone fractures and infection with a bacterium called Clostridium difficile that can be especially dangerous to elderly patients. In a recent paper, experts recommended that older adults use the drugs only “for the shortest duration possible.”

It goes on…

Studies have shown long-term P.P.I. use may reduce the absorption of important nutrients, vitamins and minerals, including magnesium, calcium and vitamin B12, and might reduce the effectiveness of other medications, with the F.D.A. warning that taking Prilosec together with the anticlotting agent clopidogrel (Plavix) can weaken the protective effect (of clopidogrel) for heart patients.

Other research has found that people taking P.P.I.’s are at increased risk of developing pneumonia; one study even linked use of the drug to weight gain.

Read full article at blogs.nytimes

 

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Medications pile up. (image thanks to lupusfamily.com)

The typical medical approach for treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) involves either doing nothing, or guessing at the problem and trying different medications. Many of the patients that come to the IBS Treatment Center have been on numerous medications. None of which has solved their problem (or they wouldn’t be in our clinic in the first place!), and most of which were not designed to treat IBS symptoms.

Types of medications often prescribed for IBS include:

  • Antispasmodic drugs such as dicyclomine (Bentyl) or hyoscyamine (Levsin/Levbid)
  • Antidiarrhea meds such as Loperamide (or simply immodium or pepto bismol)
  • Anticonstipation meds such as Amitiza, or simply miralax.
  • Proton pump inhibitors (Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid) – These block acid production, but don’t have anything to do with IBS.
  • Antidepressants such as amitryptilene (Elavil) or Lexapro.
  • Antibiotics – Xifaxamin/Rifaximin. They are not any better than many other antibiotics except that they aren’t absorbed.

These drugs may be prescribed as a best guess, in the hopes that the patient will experience some relief. Research continues on IBS medications, but most of the time medications fail to cure the majority of patients. There is no single cause for IBS, and there will never be just one treatment that works for everyone.

(more…)

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