treating celiac disease

(image thanks to blog.vitacost.com)

This article should read, “Celiac disease is curable by changing your diet. But there is not yet a symptomatic treatment like we have for most other self induced ‘diseases.'”

The medical system is still working on a drug to sell you that will give you the false sense that you’ve solved the problem.

For example, the article states, “There is no treatment for celiac disease — which can cause bloating, diarrhea and constipation in some patients and mood swings and neurological symptoms in others — but it can be managed by eliminating gluten from your diet.”

It’s worth pointing out that celiac disease’s adverse effects can be completely reversed by eliminating gluten from the patient’s diet.  In fact, there is no test that can diagnose celiac disease in a patient who has eliminated gluten from their diet for a sufficient (months-long) period. 

So there is a cure for the problem – stop dosing the patient with poison. 

People with celiac don’t have a disease if they don’t eat gluten in the same way that everyone doesn’t have lead poisoning if they don’t get exposed to lead.

Excerpt from Washington Post:

Whether it’s for diagnosed celiac disease or suspected gluten sensitivity, many parents are switching their children to gluten-free diets. Busy parents might feel overwhelmed by the thought of a big dietary overhaul for kids already picky about food (and change in general). But going gluten-free doesn’t have to be scary.

“Parents are afraid to even try it because it sounds like it would be too hard,” said Taylor-Klaus, a parenting coach in Atlanta. “I was one of those parents. I’m not saying it’s not hard. But [Bex] became so much easier to manage that the trade-off was far superior to what I thought it would be.”

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Image thanks to blog.vitacost.com

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(image thanks to glutenfreehelp.info)

Celiac disease is a hereditary allergy to gluten that results in damage to the small intestine. Common symptoms include loose stools, fatigue, weight loss and generally poor health. However, symptoms can vary widely and include constipation, weight gain, and a skin condition called dermatitis herpetiformis.  

What Is Gluten? 

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten is responsible for the springiness and stretchiness of bread. Without it, bread turns out heavy and dense. 



How Is Celiac Disease Diagnosed? 


Celiac disease can be assessed by blood tests or by a biopsy of the small intestine performed during an upper endoscopy. The blood tests include the tissue transglutaminase antibody test and the newer deamidated gliadin antibody test. The endomysial antibody test is older and is not as senstive as the newer tests. 



How Common Is Celiac Disease? 


The occurrence of celiac disease is much higher than previously thought. A recent study put the prevalence at 1 in every 133 people, making it one the most common genetic diseases known. Once diagnosed, 1 in 22 first degree relatives, and 1 in 39 second degree relatives, is also diagnosed positive.

How Is Celiac Disease Different from a Gluten Intolerance? 


Although celiac disease is a gluten allergy, it is only one form of gluten allergy. Many react to gluten and may have elevated serum antigliadin antibodies, but they do not have damage to the small intestine. These people have a negative biopsy of the small intestine, as well as negative antiendomysial antibody and tissue transglutaminase tests.

Image thanks to glutenfreehelp.info

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Questions about Celiac Disease

What Is Celiac Disease?


Celiac disease is a hereditary allergy to gluten that results in damage to the small intestine.Common symptoms include loose stools, fatigue, weight loss and generally poor health. However, symptoms can vary widely and include constipation, weight gain, and a skin condition called dermatitis herpetiformis.

What Is Gluten? 


Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten is responsible for the springiness and stretchiness of bread. Without it, bread turns out heavy and dense.

How Is Celiac Disease Diagnosed? 


Celiac disease can be assessed by blood tests or by a biopsy of the small intestine performed during an upper endoscopy. The blood tests include the tissue transglutaminase antibody test and the newer deamidated gliadin antibody test. The endomysial antibody test is older and is not as senstive as the newer tests.

How Common Is Celiac Disease? 

The occurrence of celiac disease is much higher than previously thought. A recent study put the prevalence at 1 in every 133 people, making it one the most common genetic diseases known. Once diagnosed, 1 in 22 first degree relatives, and 1 in 39 second degree relatives, is also diagnosed positive.
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We came across this article, which discusses fertility issues in women with celiac disease and wanted to share. 

Since the beginning of 2010, there have been 10 articles published about issues in fertility associated with celiac disease.

This particular study mentions that few gynecologists are aware of these issues.  Which simply confirms how important celiac disease is and especially how important it is for people with a wide variety of health problems to get screened for celiac.

Excerpt from MedPageToday.com:

Women with celiac disease had significantly more problems related to fertility and pregnancy than a control group of women who did not have the condition, investigators reported here.


Patients with celiac disease had increased difficulty conceiving compared with controls (41.2% versus 36.5%, P=0.03), as well as more consultations with fertility specialists and higher rates of spontaneous abortion, preterm delivery, and cesarean section.


Women with celiac disease also tended to have a shorter duration of fertility, marked by later onset of menarche and younger age at menopause, Stephanie M. Moleski, MD, said at the American College of Gastroenterology meeting.


“On the basis of this retrospective analysis, we have concluded that there is a relationship between celiac disease, fertility, and pregnancy outcomes, suggesting a need for increased awareness of this association among patients and physicians,” said Moleski, of Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals in Philadelphia.


Studies dating back more than 40 years have shown higher rates of menstrual abnormalities and pregnancy complications among women with celiac disease. However, inconsistency in the findings has led to continued investigation to determine the relationship between celiac disease and problems related to fertility and pregnancy.


Read the article in its entirety at medpagetoday.com
Image thanks to blog.lady-comp.com

 

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(image thanks to byu.edu)

Always question what you read online. What is the source? What is their motivation?

A recent article discusses the approach of some researchers to celiac disease is to “Counter celiac disease with early glutens.”

This study is missing the point. It’s not just about celiac disease, it’s about all gluten sensitivity.  They only looked for celiac disease, so they miss most of the kids who were in fact gluten intolerant.

Excerpt:

“Contact with gluten triggers the disease. So the way the protein was introduced and the age at which this is done appeared to be affecting the developments.

Whereas earlier advice gave the go-ahead to give infants a little gluten-containing food from the age of four months, the new parental guidelines recommended waiting until the child reached six months.

But contrary to the expectations of dieticians, the number of coeliac disease cases started to mount.

What was going on?

Could the new diet be giving infants stronger symptoms, thus making the disease easier to diagnose at an early stage? Or was the share of children with coeliac disease actually on the rise?”

Also worth highlighting:

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