symptoms of food allergies

(img thanks to commons.wikimedia.org)
(img thanks to commons.wikimedia.org)

Food allergies can cause a lot more problems than you or your doctor probably realize. After having worked with thousands of patients with food allergies, we know this to be true.

Although there is plenty of published research on the symptoms of food allergies, there is also a lot of misunderstanding due to conflicting definitions of allergies; some testing methods that are scientifically invalid; and the length of time between exposure to a food and the reaction.

Headaches, including Migraines

Headaches are about inflammation. And food allergies are also about inflammation. It is not at all unusual for our patients to report that their headaches have disappeared once they know how to stop triggering them with their diet.

Ear Infections

If your child suffers from more than just the very infrequent ear infection, then they probably have a food allergy. Kids should not get ear infections. Proper testing can reveal whether a child has a food allergy that is contributing to their susceptibility to ear infections.

Sinusitis

As with kids and ear infections, adults often get chronic sinus infections. Don’t think that it must be caused by bacteria or
an environmental allergy. We regularly see chronic sinus problems that are caused by food allergies come to an end when the patient is properly diagnosed and treated.

Eczema and Hives

Whether in infants, kids, or adults, eczema and hives are often triggered by food allergies. Even if an allergist has told you that you don’t have a food allergy, you could still have one. Standard tests, including skin prick testing and RAST testing
cannot measure allergies mediated by certain types of antibodies.


(photo via wikimedia commons)

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(photo: commons.wikimedia)
(photo: commons.wikimedia)

Food allergies can cause many more problems than you (or your doctor) probably realize.

After having worked with thousands of patients with food allergies, we know this to be true.

Although there is plenty of published research on the symptoms of food allergies, there is also a lot of misunderstanding due to conflicting definitions of allergies; some testing methods that are scientifically invalid; and the length of time between exposure to a food and the reaction.

The following are a few of the more common conditions that we regularly see cured by avoiding a food allergen.

Headaches, including Migraines

Headaches are about inflammation. And food allergies are also about inflammation. It is not at all unusual for our patients to report that their headaches have disappeared once they know how to stop triggering them with their diet.

Ear Infections

If your child suffers from more than just the very infrequent ear infection, then they probably have a food allergy.

Kids should not get ear infections. Proper testing can reveal whether a child has a food allergy that is contributing to their susceptibility to ear infections.
(more…)

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(photo: commons.wikimedia)
(photo: commons.wikimedia)

Out of China comes a wonderful study on a link between IgG food allergies and enlarged adenoids. The researchers noticed a significant difference in IgG food reactions between children with enlarged adenoids and a control group.

Adenoids are in the back of your throat and are part of the immune system. People with enlarged adenoids often suffer from chronic ear infections or snoring.

Adenoids increase in size when the immune system is responding to something. Therefore something must be triggering the adenoids to enlarge. This study shows that there is a strong link to food allergies.

It has long been my suspicion that enlarged adenoids and enlarged tonsils are primarily due to food allergies. The secondary infection that develops in tonsils comes after the tonsils are enlarged and pockets have already developed, which are easily infected.

Tonsils should be able to handle infections. That is what they were designed to do. It’s only when overcome by other immune triggers (such as food allergies), which trigger chronic inflammation, that they fail at their job.Removing the adenoids or the tonsils is only a temporary solution. It doesn’t address the original cause of the problem.

The top 3 foods that they found were related to enlarged adenoids?  Egg, Dairy, and cod.

Hopefully we’ll get more research like this in the future.

Excerpt from National Institutes of Health:

OBJECTIVE:
To explore the relationship between food intolerance and adenoidal hypertrophy and accordingly to provide evidence for intolerance and adenoidal hypertrophy.

CONCLUSION:
Food intolerance is the possible cause of adenoidal hypertrophy. The detection of specific IgG antibodies of food have positive significance in the prevention of adenoidal hypertrophy.

Image via commons.wikimedia

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(img thanks to journalstar.com)

Acne may be one of the most common conditions known to humans. It can be embarrassing, frustrating, and downright unfair.

Fortunately, most of the time, it is also avoidable. 

Most people assume that getting acne is a normal part of life. But why do some people get acne when others do not? And why do certain people have such bad cases of acne?

Commercial treatments for acne focus on keeping the skin clean and clearing clogged pores. This sounds reasonable, but again, why do some people have to obsessively clean their skin when others do not? And why do some people cleanse, exfoliate, deep clean and still get acne? 



What’s Wrong with this Approach to Acne? 


The real problem with this approach to acne is that acne develops from inside the body, not outside. The skin is an organ, and it is an organ of elimination. We eliminate waste products through our skin, just as we loose minerals when we sweat. 
Too many toxins inside the body can lead to inflammation in the skin resulting in clogged pores and acne. In order to treat the cause of the acne we must first remove the toxins. 



Why Do Antibiotics Help, but Only Temporarily? 


The inflamed and clogged pores of acne become infected. This is what causes puss. Antibiotics may help treat this infection. Unfortunately, acne comes back when the antibiotics are discontinued because the underlying cause that leads to inflammation and clogged pores, toxins in the body, still exists. 
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The Standard Food Allergy Profile test takes the guesswork out of treating your IBS and saves you a great deal of time, effort, and discomfort. And if by chance your test happens to be negative, you can quickly move on to other potential causes of your problem without spending valuable time on an unsuccessful elimination diet and then wondering if you actually did it correctly.

Food allergy testing is a highly specialized procedure performed only by doctors trained in recognizing and treating non-anaphylactic food allergies, and only in laboratories especially equipped to handle the sophisticated testing required. In order to give you an accurate result, this test must be a blood test, and must include, IgE and IgG antibodies at minimum, and probably IgA antibodies in most cases. If it does not evaluate these antibodies, there is a strong possibility that the testing will miss your food allergy.

(image thanks to colourbox.com)

Foods Included in the Standard Food Allergy Panel – 96 foods

Dairy: Cow’s milk, whey, casein, mozzarella cheese, cheddar cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt, goat’s milk.

Meat and Poultry: beef, chicken, lamb, pork, chicken, eggs white (chicken), egg yolk (chicken), whole egg (duck), turkey.

Grains: amaranth, barley, buckwheat, corn, gliadin (wheat), gluten (wheat), oat, rice (white), rye, spelt, whole wheat.

Seafoods: lobster, clam, cod, crab, halibut, scallop, salmon, shrimp, red snapper, sole, tuna

Vegetables: avocado, broccoli, beet, bell pepper (green), cabbage (white), carrot, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, garlic, lettuce, mushroom, olive (black), onion (white), potato (white), pumpkin, radish, spinach, sweet potato, tomato, zucchini squash.

Nuts: almond, coconut, hazelnut, peanut, pecan, sesame seed, sunflower seed, walnut

Legumes: green pea, kidney bean, lentil, lima bean, peanut, pinto bean, string bean, soy bean.

Fruits: apple, apricot, banana, blueberry, cherry, grape (red), grapefruit, lemon, orange, papaya, peach, pear, pineapple, plum, raspberry, strawberry.

Miscellaneous: coffee bean, cocoa (chocolate) bean, honey, baker’s yeast, brewer’s yeast, sugar cane.

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Image thanks to colourbox.com