food allergy symptoms

(img thanks to commons.wikimedia.org)
(img thanks to commons.wikimedia.org)

Food allergies can cause a lot more problems than you or your doctor probably realize. After having worked with thousands of patients with food allergies, we know this to be true.

Although there is plenty of published research on the symptoms of food allergies, there is also a lot of misunderstanding due to conflicting definitions of allergies; some testing methods that are scientifically invalid; and the length of time between exposure to a food and the reaction.

Headaches, including Migraines

Headaches are about inflammation. And food allergies are also about inflammation. It is not at all unusual for our patients to report that their headaches have disappeared once they know how to stop triggering them with their diet.

Ear Infections

If your child suffers from more than just the very infrequent ear infection, then they probably have a food allergy. Kids should not get ear infections. Proper testing can reveal whether a child has a food allergy that is contributing to their susceptibility to ear infections.

Sinusitis

As with kids and ear infections, adults often get chronic sinus infections. Don’t think that it must be caused by bacteria or
an environmental allergy. We regularly see chronic sinus problems that are caused by food allergies come to an end when the patient is properly diagnosed and treated.

Eczema and Hives

Whether in infants, kids, or adults, eczema and hives are often triggered by food allergies. Even if an allergist has told you that you don’t have a food allergy, you could still have one. Standard tests, including skin prick testing and RAST testing
cannot measure allergies mediated by certain types of antibodies.


(photo via wikimedia commons)

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Dr. Stephen Wangen of the IBS Treatment Center.
Dr. Stephen Wangen of the IBS Treatment Center.

Acne may be one of the most common conditions known to humans. It can be embarrassing, frustrating, and downright unfair. Fortunately, most of the time, it is also avoidable. 



The Traditional View of Acne 


Most people assume that getting acne is a normal part of life. But why do some people get acne when others do not? And why do certain people have such bad cases of acne? Commercial treatments for acne focus on keeping the skin clean and clearing clogged pores. This sounds reasonable, but again, why do some people have to obsessively clean their skin when others do not? And why do some people cleanse, exfoliate, deep clean and still get acne? 



What’s Wrong with this Approach to Acne? 


Acne develops from inside the body, not outside. The skin is an organ, and it is an organ of elimination. We eliminate waste products through our skin, just as we lose minerals when we sweat. 


Too many toxins inside the body can lead to inflammation in the skin resulting in clogged pores and acne. In order to treat the cause of the acne we must first remove the toxins. 


(more…)

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(img via commons.wikimedia)
(img via commons.wikimedia)

It might be surprising to find us writing about headaches, but they are so frequently caused by the same things that cause digestive problems that they have been begging for an article for many years.

Migraines and tension headaches, like IBS, are often associated with stress. But also like IBS they can come on for seemingly no reason at all and are often caused by problems far more specific than stress.

Whether or not you have digestive problems, you may be able to completely eliminate your headaches by simply changing your diet. And we can help you do it.

It is not unusual for patients to visit us for digestive problems only to find that after implementing their individualized treatment plan their headaches have also resolved. Some patients do come to us specifically for the treatment of their headaches, whether they are migraine, tension, and even sinus headaches. Although patients tend to make a big distinction between migraine headaches and tension headaches due to a frequent difference in their severity, they can have the exact same triggers.
(more…)

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(photo: commons.wikimedia)
(photo: commons.wikimedia)

Food allergies can cause many more problems than you (or your doctor) probably realize.

After having worked with thousands of patients with food allergies, we know this to be true.

Although there is plenty of published research on the symptoms of food allergies, there is also a lot of misunderstanding due to conflicting definitions of allergies; some testing methods that are scientifically invalid; and the length of time between exposure to a food and the reaction.

The following are a few of the more common conditions that we regularly see cured by avoiding a food allergen.

Headaches, including Migraines

Headaches are about inflammation. And food allergies are also about inflammation. It is not at all unusual for our patients to report that their headaches have disappeared once they know how to stop triggering them with their diet.

Ear Infections

If your child suffers from more than just the very infrequent ear infection, then they probably have a food allergy.

Kids should not get ear infections. Proper testing can reveal whether a child has a food allergy that is contributing to their susceptibility to ear infections.
(more…)

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Is There a Link Between Your Sinusitis and Food Allergies?

(commons.wikimedia)
(commons.wikimedia)

Chronic congestion of the sinuses, ears and/or the nose can be an extremely frustrating sinusitis problem that does not ever truly seem to go away. 


All too often I hear patients state that they have not found relief even after many rounds of antibiotics or multiple surgeries. This is because antibiotics and surgery often don’t address the cause of the congestion.

What Causes Sinusitis and Runny Nose? 


Sinus infection (sinusitis) and runny nose are inflammatory conditions that result in mucous production and congestion. This leads to the resulting problems of sinus pressure headaches, a runny nose, or stuffy ears. 



What Causes the Inflammation? 


Inflammation is caused by anything that can activate the immune system. It can be caused by a bacterial, fungal, or viral infections, or by environmental or food allergies. 
Bacterial and fungal infections are readily treated by antibiotics, and viral infections generally resolve on their own. Food allergies are the most under-rated cause of inflammation and congestion, and frequently exacerbate known environmental allergies. 



How Do Food Allergies Trigger Sinusitis or a Runny Nose? 


An allergy is an immune response, resulting in inflammation and in this case mucous production. Such a response to food can be exhibited in any part of the body, because nutrients are digested, absorbed and circulated throughout the body. This is why food allergies can cause a wide range of problems, including sinusitis and runny noses. 
There are many other conditions that can be caused by food allergies.

What Foods Trigger Sinusitis and Allergic Rhinitis?


Any food that can trigger the immune system via an allergic reaction is capable of causing sinusitis or allergic rhinitis. And the fact is, any food is equally capable of triggering an allergic reaction. 
There is no one-to-one correlation between foods and symptoms or diseases. Food allergies result in inflammation, which then leads to problems such as sinusitis. 
Therefore proper blood testing must be done in order to determine one’s food allergies. 


(more…)

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(photo: commons.wikimedia)
(photo: commons.wikimedia)

Food allergies can cause a lot more problems than you or your doctor probably realize. After having worked with thousands of patients with food allergies, we know this to be true.

Although there is plenty of published research on the symptoms of food allergies, there is also a lot of confusion due to conflicting definitions of allergies; some testing methods that are scientifically invalid; and the length of time between exposure to a food and the reaction.

The following are a few of the more common conditions that we regularly see cured by avoiding a food allergen.

Headaches, including Migraines

Headaches are about inflammation. And food allergies are also about inflammation. It is not at all unusual for our patients to report that their headaches have disappeared once they know how to stop triggering them with their diet.

Ear Infections

If your child suffers from more than just the very infrequent ear infection, then they probably have a food allergy.
Kids should not get ear infections. Proper testing can reveal whether a child has a food allergy that is contributing to their susceptibility to ear infections.

Sinusitis

As with kids and ear infections, adults often get chronic sinus infections. Don’t think that it must be caused by bacteria or an environmental allergy. We regularly see chronic sinus problems that are caused by food allergies come to an end when the patient is properly diagnosed and treated.
(more…)

rssyoutube

(img thanks to openclipart)
(img thanks to openclipart)

Chronic congestion of the sinuses, ears and/or the nose can be an extremely frustrating sinusitis problem that does not ever truly seem to go away. 


All too often I hear patients state that they have not found relief even after many rounds of antibiotics or multiple surgeries. This is because antibiotics and surgery often don’t address the cause of the congestion.

What Causes Sinusitis and Runny Nose? 


Sinus infection (sinusitis) and runny nose are inflammatory conditions that result in mucous production and congestion. This leads to the resulting problems of sinus pressure headaches, a runny nose, or stuffy ears. 



Then What Causes Inflammation? 


Inflammation is caused by anything that can activate the immune system. It can be caused by a bacterial, fungal, or viral infections, or by environmental or food allergies. 
Bacterial and fungal infections are readily treated by antibiotics, and viral infections generally resolve on their own. Food allergies are the most under-rated cause of inflammation and congestion, and frequently exacerbate known environmental allergies. 



How Do Food Allergies Trigger Sinusitis or a Runny Nose? 


An allergy is an immune response, resulting in inflammation and in this case mucous production. Such a response to food can be exhibited in any part of the body, because nutrients are digested, absorbed and circulated throughout the body. This is why food allergies can cause a wide range of problems, including sinusitis and runny noses. 
There are many other conditions that can be caused by food allergies.
(more…)

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(img via commons.wikimedia)
(img via commons.wikimedia)

Many people with chronic headaches suffer for years with no permanent relief.

Whether or not you have migraine headaches, tension headaches, sinus headaches, or an undetermined form of headache, it is very possible that you are suffering from food allergy-induced inflammation. Recent research on migraines indicates that food allergies mediated by IgG-type antibodies are specifically to blame.

A headache is really a symptom of something else. It is obviously pain in the head, but the common factor is that headaches of all types usually involve inflammation. If the immune system reacts to one or more of the foods that you eat, then an inflammatory reaction is taking place that can potentially affect your head. Such reactions are far more common than many people realize.

The inflammation and thus the headache will resolve once the triggering food or foods are removed from the diet. Sometimes this is easier said than done, because the foods that we eat are often complicated combinations of numerous base foods. But once the problem is understood, the results can be dramatic.

Food Allergies and Headaches: Q&A with the IBS Treatment Center’s Dr. Stephen Wangen

Is It Possible to Eliminate the Pain and Inflammation without Drugs?

Very often it is actually possible to eliminate the cause of the pain and inflammation without resorting to drugs to suppress it. Inflammation is actually caused by the immune system, which then leads to pain. The important question is, “Why is the immune system creating inflammation?”

What Triggers the Immune System to Create Inflammation?

As you already know, bacteria, viruses, and parasites trigger an immune response. But anything that triggers an immune response also triggers inflammation. This includes foods that are incorrectly identified by the immune system as not belonging in the body. Therefore an allergic reaction to a food can result in inflammation.
(more…)

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(img via commons.wikimedia)
(img via commons.wikimedia)

Food allergies can cause a lot more problems than you (or your doctor) probably realize.

Having worked with thousands of patients with food allergies, we at the IBS Treatment Center know this to be true.

Although there is plenty of published research on the symptoms of food allergies, there is also a lot of misunderstanding due to conflicting definitions of allergies; some testing methods that are scientifically invalid; and the length of time between exposure to a food and the reaction.

Let’s go over some of the more common symptoms that we often see at our clinic.

Headaches, including Migraines
Headaches are about inflammation. And food allergies are also about inflammation. It is not at all unusual for our patients to report that their headaches have disappeared once they know how to stop triggering them with their diet.

Ear Infections
If your child suffers from more than just the very infrequent ear infection, then they probably have a food allergy.
Kids should not get ear infections. Proper testing can reveal whether a child has a food allergy that is contributing to their susceptibility to ear infections.

Sinusitis
As with kids and ear infections, adults often get chronic sinus infections. Don’t think that it must be caused by bacteria or an environmental allergy. We regularly see chronic sinus problems that are caused by food allergies come to an end when the patient is properly diagnosed and treated.

Eczema and Hives
Whether in infants, kids, or adults, eczema and hives are often triggered by food allergies. Even if an allergist has told you that you don’t have a food allergy, you could still have one. Standard tests, including skin prick testing and RAST testing cannot measure allergies mediated by certain types of antibodies.
(more…)

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(photo: commons.wikimedia)
(photo: commons.wikimedia)

This study shows that fatigue is common in people with IBS and food hypersensitivities.

From National Institutes of Health:

Chronic fatigue in patients with unexplained self-reported food hypersensitivity and irritable bowel syndrome: validation of a Norwegian translation of the Fatigue Impact Scale.

Authors: Lind R, Berstad A, Hatlebakk J, Valeur J.

Source
Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen.

BACKGROUND:
Patients with unexplained self-reported food hypersensitivity and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) suffer from several health complaints, including fatigue. The aim of the present study was to validate a Norwegian translation of the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS), and to assess the impact of fatigue in patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity and IBS, as compared with healthy controls.
(more…)

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Tooth Damage May Be Linked to Celiac Disease

(img from commons.wikimedia)
(img from commons.wikimedia)

Damage to teeth is very common in celiac disease patients who have not gone gluten free.  It may be the most common symptom in patients who are “symptom free.” 

Like headaches and some mild digestive issues, tooth damage is probably one of the common signs of celiac that is usually ignored.  Dentists are largely ignorant with regards to this issue and as a result are unable to tell patients more than “you have bad teeth.”  The damage is not reversed by going gluten free so it is important to diagnose celiac disease early.

People who have bad looking teeth and dental enamel defects should be considering gluten intolerance and celiac disease. I have it too, and no dentist ever had a clue. They just wanted to sell me things to whiten my teeth.

Excerpt from TheGlobeandMail.com:

Nevertheless, dental problems are common in people with celiac disease, studies have shown. But “if you talk to most dentists, they would not know this connection,” said Dr. Mohsin Rashid, a gastroenterologist at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax.

Awareness of the link is crucial, since in some patients, tooth enamel defects and recurrent canker sores are the only manifestations of celiac disease, Rashid said. If a dentist notices abnormalities in tooth enamel in a routine check-up, “this is a relatively easy way of suspecting or identifying this condition,” he explained.


Image from commons.wikimedia

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Food Allergies, Sinusitis and Runny Nose

(img thanks to openclipart)
(img thanks to openclipart)

Chronic congestion of the sinuses, ears and/or the nose can be an extremely frustrating sinusitis problem that does not ever truly seem to go away.

All too often I hear patients state that they have not found relief even after many rounds of antibiotics or multiple surgeries. This is because antibiotics and surgery often don’t address the cause of the congestion.

What Causes Sinusitis and Runny Nose? 


Sinus infection (sinusitis) and runny nose are inflammatory conditions that result in mucous production and congestion. This leads to the resulting problems of sinus pressure headaches, a runny nose, or stuffy ears. 



Then What Causes Inflammation? 


Inflammation is caused by anything that can activate the immune system. It can be caused by a bacterial, fungal, or viral infections, or by environmental or food allergies. 
Bacterial and fungal infections are readily treated by antibiotics, and viral infections generally resolve on their own. Food allergies are the most under-rated cause of inflammation and congestion, and frequently exacerbate known environmental allergies. 



How Do Food Allergies Trigger Sinusitis or a Runny Nose? 


An allergy is an immune response, resulting in inflammation and in this case mucous production. Such a response to food can be exhibited in any part of the body, because nutrients are digested, absorbed and circulated throughout the body. This is why food allergies can cause a wide range of problems, including sinusitis and runny noses. 
There are many other conditions that can be caused by food allergies.
(more…)

rssyoutube

(img thanks to motherearthnews.com)

It might be surprising to find us writing about headaches, but they are so frequently caused by the same things that cause digestive problems that they have been begging for an article for many years.

Migraines and tension headaches, like Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), are often associated with stress. Also like IBS, they can come on for seemingly no reason at all and are often caused by problems far more specific than stress.

Whether or not you have digestive problems, you may be able to completely eliminate your headaches by simply changing your diet. And we can help you do it.

It is not unusual for patients to visit us for digestive problems only to find that after implementing their individualized treatment plan their headaches have also resolved.

Some patients do come to us specifically for the treatment of their headaches, whether they are migraine, tension, and even sinus headaches. Although patients tend to make a big distinction between migraine headaches and tension headaches due to a frequent difference in their severity, they can have the exact same triggers. Whether or not you are taking migraine medications such as Imitrex (sumatriptan) and Topamax, or you buy your NSAID pain medications in large bottles at Costco, the ability to resolve your headaches remains the same.

Food allergies are the number one cause of headaches of all types. These are not the kind of food allergies an allergist is going to diagnose because allergists don’t deal with headache-related food allergies. These are the “hidden” types of food allergies.
(more…)

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(image thanks to iuhealth.org)

The body can be allergic to any food, therefore any food allergy is capable of causing inflammation and arthritis.

This includes Rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile arthritis, and undefined joint pains. This is why it can be so difficult for one to recognize the relationship between their diet and their symptoms.

Let’s use a dairy allergy as an example. If you eat any form of dairy, be it milk, butter, cheese, yogurt, or even dairy in the form of casein or whey in another food product, such as bread or milk chocolate, then you can potentially trigger the symptoms of your food allergy, in this case arthritis. You should also know that allergy symptoms may show up hours or even a day later, well after a food is absorbed into your system. 



The Traditional Approach to Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is considered by conventional medicine to be an autoimmune condition of unknown cause. This belief ignores a large volume of scientific evidence pointing to food allergies as a major cause of arthritis. The medical community has focused almost solely on treating arthritis with anti-inflammatory medications, either prescription or over-the-counter. These medications offer temporary relief of the pain and swelling, but they never cure arthritis. Over the long term this type of treatment also comes with a host of side-effects.

Is It Possible to Eliminate the Inflammation without Drugs?
(more…)

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Arthritis is one of the most debilitating conditions in our culture.

In fact, it’s the number one cause of lost work days at Boeing. Unfortunately, treatment is limited and almost solely focused on anti-inflammatory medications, not on eliminating the original trigger of that inflammation.

Is It Possible to Eliminate the Inflammation without Drugs?

The word “arthritis” simply means “joint inflammation.” Very often it is actually possible to eliminate the cause of the inflammation without resorting to drugs to suppress it. Inflammation is actually caused by the immune system. The important question is, “Why is the immune system creating inflammation?”

What Triggers the Immune System to Create Inflammation?

As you already know, bacteria, viruses, and parasites trigger an immune response. But anything that triggers an immune response also triggers inflammation. This includes foods that are incorrectly identified by the immune system as not belonging in the body. Therefore an allergic reaction to a food can result in inflammation of the joints.

How Do I Determine if I Have a Food Allergy?

Most doctors are not well versed in evaluating patients for food allergies. Skin testing is inadequate, and many blood tests are not thorough enough to discover a food allergy. The best way to determine if you have a food allergy is to have your blood tested for both IgE and IgG antibodies to a variety of foods. This is done with an ELISA Food Allergy Panel, which measures your immune response to approximately 100 different foods.

Information on testing for food allergies here.

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